Going Out on a High Note!

19 performances later, the Fringe is over for team Shadows. We had such a blast!  And just as we were heading out we got this FIVE-STAR REVIEW from FringeGuru, so at least we went out on a high note!

See you next year, Fringe!

xo

The Glass Elevator

NSDF Emerging Artists Competition

The House of Shadows was shortlisted for the National Student Drama Festival Emerging Artists Award at this year’s Fringe!  Congratulations to the winner, Kiss Me and You Will See How Important I Am.

Four Star Review from Broadway Baby!

Dancing in the Dark

Broadway Baby Rating:

Within the House of Shadows, there is an explanation for cultural popularity that I found rather endearing. A secret society of members visit a struggling author, blindfold him, and urge him to tell them a story. If he is successful, he is admitted into their cadre and is promised undying fame. As metaphors for the struggles of succeeding in the Edinburgh Fringe go, it takes some beating. But it was only one of the many ideas swirling around the House of Shadows. While not all of them are executed brilliantly, there are more than enough ideas here to keep you thinking.

The plot centres around writer Joseph Lambert, trying to write his great work in the ‘hot countries’. He pines after the mysterious Lucinda on the opposing balcony, while his very shadow longs for his freedom. As the play advances, his shadow begins to take on more of its very own personality. The play consists only of Lambert, and his shadow. Their physical intertwined interaction is impressive, with some snappy dialogue. In addition their speeches directly aimed to their audience are delivered with the right amount of flair. The script contains enough motifs and symbols to retain interest and the understated conclusion provides a sense of fulfilment and closure.

If there are problems with the play, it is that emotional highs are too quickly reached. By the third instance of Lambert pleading for something or other repetition already sets in. And some plot strands are left a little unclear, and extraneous to the plot itself. But, overall, the play is carried on the back of the performances and it more than excels in its mid-afternoon slot. At forty five minutes long it’s worth seeing as a pre-dinner aperitif.

Playing with Shadow puppets.

Peter Bestoso as The Man and Bryan Kauder as The Shadow

Photography by Anne McGrath

Peter Bestoso as The Man and Bryan Kauder as The Shadow
Photography by Anne McGrath

Peter Bestoso as The Man and Bryan Kauder as The Shadow

Photography by Anne McGrath

The boys have a copycat!

The boys have a copycat!

Chillin’ at Fringe Central!  Gotta love free wifi!

Chillin’ at Fringe Central!  Gotta love free wifi!

We try a new publicity stunt on the Royal Mile!

Stage Manager Eleanor Regan goofs off for the camera while talking to one of theSpace’s technicians.

Stage Manager Eleanor Regan goofs off for the camera while talking to one of theSpace’s technicians.

Scenes from the Royal Mile - week 1!

Peter Bestoso as The Man & Bryan Kauder as The Shadow

Peter Bestoso as The Man & Bryan Kauder as The Shadow

Team Shadows makes a similarly-blue-shirted friend on the Royal Mile.

Team Shadows makes a similarly-blue-shirted friend on the Royal Mile.

Just a little (very little) bit of “House of Shadows” advertising on the mile!

Peter Bestoso as The Man
Photography by Anne McGrath

Peter Bestoso as The Man

Photography by Anne McGrath